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Adventures in Engineering
The wanderings of a modern ronin.

Ben Cantrick
  Date: 2007-09-24 16:40
  Subject:   Mass-produced solar, $2 a watt installed.
Public
  Music:Front 242 - Gripped By Fear
  Tags:  reddit

Colorado State University's method for manufacturing low-cost, high-efficiency solar panels is nearing mass production. AVA Solar Inc. will start production by the end of next year on the technology developed by mechanical engineering Professor W.S. Sampath at Colorado State. The new 200-megawatt factory is expected to employ up to 500 people. Based on the average household usage, 200 megawatts will power 40,000 U.S. homes.

Produced at less than $1 per watt, the panels will dramatically reduce the cost of generating solar electricity and could power homes and businesses around the globe with clean energy for roughly the same cost as traditionally generated electricity.


http://www.industryweek.com/ReadArticle.aspx?ArticleID=14932


Anyone hear a big shiver from the offices of oil companies all across the world?
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Coinneach Fitzpatrick
  User: scarybaldguy
  Date: 2007-09-24 22:47 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
I've been looking into solar for the new house. $22K? Um... how about not.
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Ben Cantrick
  User: mackys
  Date: 2007-09-24 23:03 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
Where does it say $22k? At $2/watt, that would be 11,000 W. If your house can suck down 11 kW I'd be insanely impressed. This page says that an average household consumes about 1 kW an hour.
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Coinneach Fitzpatrick
  User: scarybaldguy
  Date: 2007-09-24 23:05 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
No, that's the current estimate I've gotten for a rooftop installation.
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Ben Cantrick
  User: mackys
  Date: 2007-09-24 23:30 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
Oh, I see. Yeah... at current prices? $20k no problem.
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  User: nickhalfasleep
  Date: 2007-09-24 23:32 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
Did you include in that the state and federal rebates?
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Coinneach Fitzpatrick
  User: scarybaldguy
  Date: 2007-09-25 04:18 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
No. I don't include tax rebates in anything I buy because I don't expect to receive them without spending more in legal fees to make the Infernal Retard Service keep their promises.
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  User: nickhalfasleep
  Date: 2007-09-24 23:35 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
Database of State Incentives for Renewables
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  User: nickhalfasleep
  Date: 2007-09-24 23:01 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
Everybody talks about mass produced thinfilm like it's only 5 years away, and that's been happening for... 15 years. It will happen, and it will be interesting to see how popular green buildings and net metering will be.
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Willow: DI Impactor
  User: willow_red
  Date: 2007-09-25 14:05 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
Keyword:DI Impactor
Thin film is out there...at least for spacecraft. But I gotta say, it is crazy-inefficient. I suppose that's fine if you have a big roof and low power consumption. The current production isn't too bad, but the voltage per cell is barely high enough to be useful.
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osmium_ocelot
  User: osmium_ocelot
  Date: 2007-09-25 01:53 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
Fuck Yeah!
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Ohmi
  User: ohmisunao
  Date: 2007-09-25 08:11 (UTC)
  Subject:   (no subject)
More like I hear shotguns being loaded by said oil companies. I fear for all the new awesome electricity tech companies.. let's hope they make it to market.
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  User: (Anonymous)
  Date: 2007-09-27 02:47 (UTC)
  Subject:   Invest and get repaid
What's even better about Solar Power is that you can sell off the excess energy back to the power companies and sometimes Xcel (and others depending on where you live) will pay for the installation of the solar panels.

A large family house will use up 15 kilowatts a day on average, that's a high estimate, even though that will equate to a $30,000 initial investment, you can absorb the cost into your mortgage AND have power companies subsidize up to 50% of the installation cost. Then your electricity bills are like $18 a year.

I think HGTV Channel has an interesting show called "Living With Ed" and he had an episode touring the "green" house of former Dallas TV Show Star Larry Hagman and had a great show of Solar and Wind powering his home and his neighbors.

- L
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