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Going Rogue - why indy game devs went indy, and what happened when they did. - Adventures in Engineering — LiveJournal
The wanderings of a modern ronin.

Ben Cantrick
  Date: 2008-08-06 15:11
  Subject:   Going Rogue - why indy game devs went indy, and what happened when they did.
Public
  Tags:  gaming, slashdot

For Peeler, it's still about the freedom. "I never would have been able to create Depths of Peril in the mainstream. I don't have a boss. My commute is now about 10 seconds to get across the room. I no longer have to go to meetings. I no longer have to deal with publishers trying to withhold payments to get their way."

"Creating indie games allowed me to gain experience and improve my skill set in a way that is almost impossible in today's game industry," Evans maintains. "By going indie, I amassed a ton of experience in three to four years time that probably would have taken me a decade to gain in the industry."

Going indie is a struggle. The challenges mount, and the dream can get frayed around the edges. But for many professionals, what brought them out of the big studios and back into the garage or bedroom to make their own games hasn't changed.


http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/issues/issue_161/5113-Going-Rogue.2
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